Thursday, February 21, 2013

Nosh Some Hamentashen




Hamentashen, whose sweet fillings peak through the center of the delicious pastry, have become the symbol of the holiday of Purim. Just like any Hanukkah celebration requires latkes, the Purim celebration needs Hamentashen. You can always purchase them in virtually any supermarket, but why not try making them at home. Here is my Hamentashen recipe that I've been using forever. I use the dough recipe that my Grandmother made. Now, she never wrote a recipe down. It was always, "a pinch of this, a handful of that", so I reconstructed this recipe from watching her make this.

3 Eggs
1 Cup Sugar
1/2 Cup Canola Oil
1/2 Cup Orange Juice
4 1/2 Cups Flour
1/4 Tsp. Baking Soda
3 Tsp. Baking Powder
1/2 Tsp. Salt

In a mixing bowl, beat the eggs, and add the sugar gradually while beating.
Continue beating, adding the oil and the orange juice.
In another bowl, combine the dry ingredients
Mix well
Add to beaten egg mixture
Dough should be a little sticky.
On a lightly floured board, roll part of the dough to a thickness of about 1/8 inch. Don't use too much flour, or the dough will be dry.
Cut circles with a cookie cutter or a glass.
In the center, place about 1 tsp of prune or apricot filling. I use Lekvar's Prune Butter and Apricot Filling.
Bring each side of the circle into the center to form a triangle, and pinch together.
Bake on a lightly greased cookie sheet at 350 for about 20 minutes 

So, gather the troops, and start baking.   

1 comment:

  1. Dough should be a little sticky.
    On a lightly floured board, roll part of the dough to a thickness of about 1/8 inch. Don't use too much flour, or the dough will be dry.
    Cut circles with a cookie cutter or a glass.
    In the center, place about 1 tsp of prune or apricot filling. I use Lekvar's Prune Butter and Apricot Filling.
    Bring each side of the circle into the center to form a triangle, and pinch together.
    Bake on a lightly greased cookie sheet at 350 for about 20 minutes

    ReplyDelete